Target — Allenwood, Pennsylvania

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In the central region of Pennsylvania, the loss of manufacturing jobs over the past four years had been a source of concern. Significant employers such as Pennsylvania House, BBA Non Woven, and JPM had disappeared. Although a rise in commercial employment partly compensated for these setbacks, the future was unclear.

It was in this atmosphere of uncertainty that Great Stream Commons Business Park was created. Funded by $13 million in bonds floated by Union County, Great Stream Commons awaited suitors while tax obligations, the responsibility of local taxpayers, loomed ahead. Then, in August 2006, prominent retailer Target Corporation signed a sales agreement to build a warehouse distribution center at the site.

“One of the reasons national companies like Target choose Pennsylvania is because of the quality and availability of our workforce and our competitive business environment,” Governor Edward G. Rendell said. “With at least 500 new jobs coming to Untion County, this project is terrific news for the region’s hardworking men and women.”

Construction is to begin in July 2007, and occupancy is scheduled for February 2009. Once construction is completed, a 1.6 million square-foot distribution center will stand on a 166-acre site. Parking space will accommodate 700 cars and 900 trucks.

The Union County Industrial Development Corporation worked with Target and the Governor’s Action Team to secure a $2.25 million funding offer from the Department of Community and Economic Development for the project. In addition, Union County obtained a $600,000 grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to be used specifically for intersection upgrades.

Target currently has 30 distribution centers in 21 states and 1,444 stores in 47 states. The company gives back more than $2 million a week to its local communities through grants and special programs. Since opening its first store in 1962, Target has partnered with nonprofit organizations, guests and team members to help meet community needs.

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