Trade & Industry Development Magazine

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September/October 2010
September/October 2010

Be courageous. I have seen many depressions in business. Always America has emerged from these stronger and more prosperous. Be brave as your fathers before you. Have faith! Go forward! - Thomas Edison

For years now, people have claimed that American manufacturing is dead, or at best quickly dying. That's an odd thing to say about what is still the largest manufacturing economy in the world. Words like "globalization" and "offshoring" have entered the lexicon as fearful harbingers. But those words cut both ways, and the U.S. has increasing footprints from foreign-based manufacturing firms. From foreign auto makers locating in the South to wind turbine manufacturers siting operations in the Midwest - are we to believe that they are locating here out of some strange abundance of compassion? Or could it be that it simply makes economic sense?

In this issue, we examine Manufacturing in the U.S. In our feature on Advanced Manufacturing, Ed McCallum provides excellent insight and advice into what manufacturing executives should seek in siting their facilities. John Rhodes offers a clear-eyed look at the Utilities sector and provides a pragmatic perspective on the issues ahead. And Harry Moser delivers eye-opening, mission-critical information for all those concerned with the bottom line, and illuminates the hidden financial benefits of Re-Shoring facilities back to the United States. Also, Jennifer Alten explores several Foreign Trade Zones, and Linda Dobel examines some of the Designated Sites, existing across the country. The Association for Manufacturing Technology provides a snapshot of where manufacturing is now and a roadmap for going forward, and Greg Jones of FTZ Corp. explains some of the significant advantages found in operating within FTZs.

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In this issue...

A January 2010 Grant Thornton survey, published in Supply Chain Solutions, concluded that 51 percent of companies that offshored found no financial advantage and 20 percent brought work closer to home in 2009. The lack of financial advantage was likely due to an initial fascination with lower labor cost and a failure to project offshoring’s total impact on revenue, overhead costs and the balance sheet. Companies deciding on site locations will benefit by calculating the TCO (Total Coat of Ownership) of parts and tools for each site considered. Re-shoring also positively impacts other factors of importance in site selection, including quality of life and supply chain environmental footprint. more...

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